Jonathan Rosenbaum über Director’s Cuts

Letzten Monat hat Slate einen Artikel von Jonathan Rosenbaum über Filmgeschichte und DVD-Marketing veröffentlicht: „Death by a Thousand Director’s Cuts – How DVD Marketing is rewriting the history of Film“.

Rosenbaum setzt sich mit dem Jargon der DVD-Vermarktung auseinander und prüft solche Begriffe wie „restoration“ und „director’s cut“. Besonders letzteren nimmt er auseinander und steuert dazu eigene Erfahrungen bei:

„When I worked as a consultant on a 1998 re-editing of Touch of Evil based on a set of suggestions Welles made to Universal in 1957 about improving its own version, our team took pains to clarify that our version wasn’t—and couldn’t be—anything else but an attempt to follow those suggestions. But our fine distinctions got lost in the shuffle, because Universal and others had already been describing a longer version, belatedly discovered in their vaults in the 1970s, as both a restoration and a director’s cut, and these erroneous labels often got affixed to the 1998 rerelease as well. Even on the jacket of the 50th-anniversary box set, released last year and containing all three versions, which I worked on in several capacities, our recut is erroneously described as both „restored“ and „definitive.“ In my own preface to the Welles memo inside that package, I was obliged by Universal to use the word „restored,“ so I had to settle for placing that word inside quotation marks.“ („Death by a Thousand Director’s Cuts – How DVD Marketing is rewriting the history of Film“. In: Slate,

If we do want to bone up on film history, some of our finest scholars are busy turning out DVD extras, and a few of them are even better at this kind of work than they are in their writing, which offers fewer opportunities of illustrating their points. Compare, for instance, the audiovisual essays of Joan Neuberger and Yuri Tsivian on the Criterion Collection DVD of Sergei Eisenstein’s Ivan the Terrible with these writers‘ recent monographs on the same subject. Or compare Tag Gallagher’s analysis of Max Ophüls‘ Earrings of Madame de … for the same label with his online article about Ophüls for the Australian Web site Senses of Cinema, which focuses on the same scene from the same film …“ („Death by a Thousand Director’s Cuts – How DVD Marketing is rewriting the history of Film“. In: Slate,

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s

%d Bloggern gefällt das: